With database attacks on the rise, how can companies protect themselves?

Misconfigured or unsecured databases exposed on the open web are a fact of life. We hear about some of them because security researchers tell us how they discovered them, pinpointed their owners and alerted them, but many others are found by attackers first.

exposed databases

It used to take months to scan the Internet looking for open systems, but attackers now have access to free and easy-to-use scanning tools that can find them in less than an hour.

“As one honeypot experiment showed, open databases are targeted hundreds of times within a few hours,” Josh Bressers, product security lead at Elastic, told Help Net Security.

“There’s no way to leave unsecured data online without opening the data up to attack. This is why it’s crucial to always enable security and authentication features when setting up databases, so that your organization avoids this risk altogether.”

What do attackers do with exposed databases?

Bressers has been involved in the security of products and projects – especially open-source – for a very long time. In the past two decades, he created the product security division at Progeny Linux Systems and worked as a manager of the Red Hat product security team and headed the security strategy in Red Hat’s Platform Business Unit.

He now manages bug bounties, penetration testing and security vulnerability programs for Elastic’s products, as well as the company’s efforts to improve application security, add new and improve existing security features as needed or requested by customers.

The problem with exposed Elasticsearch (MariaDB, MongoDB, etc.) databases, he says, is that they are often left unsecured by developers by mistake and companies don’t discover the exposure quickly.

“The scanning tools do most of the work, so it’s up to the attacker to decide if the database has any data worth stealing,” he noted, and pointed out that this isn’t hacking, exactly – it’s mining of open services.

Attackers can quickly exfiltrate the accessible data, hold it for ransom, sell it to the highest bidder, modify it or simply delete it all.

“Sometimes there’s no clear advantage or motive. For example, this summer saw a string of cyberattacks called the Meow Bot attacks that have affected at least 25,000 databases so far. The attacker replaced the contents of every afflicted database with the word ‘meow’ but has not been identified or revealed anything behind the purpose of the attack,” he explained.

Advice for organizations that use clustered databases

Open-source database platforms such as Elasticsearch have built-in security to prevent attacks of this nature, but developers often disable those features in haste or due to a lack of understanding that their actions can put customer data at risk, Bressers says.

“The most important thing to keep in mind when trying to secure data is having a clear understanding of what you are securing and what it means to your organization. How sensitive is the data? What level of security needs to be applied? Who should have access?” he explained.

“Sometimes working with a partner who is an expert at running a modern database is a more secure alternative than doing it yourself. Sometimes it’s not. Modern data management is a new problem for many organizations; make sure your people understand the opportunities and challenges. And most importantly, make sure they have the tools and training.”

Secondly, he says, companies should set up external scanning systems that continuously check for exposed databases.

“These may be the same tools used by attackers, but they immediately notify security teams when a developer has mistakenly left sensitive data unlocked. For example, a free scanner is available from Shadowserver.”

Elastic offers information and documentation on how to enable the security features of Elasticsearch databases and prevent exposure, he adds and points out that security is enabled by default in their Elasticsearch Service on Elastic Cloud and cannot be disabled.

Defense in depth

No organization will ever be 100% safe, but steps can be taken to decrease a company’s attack surface. “Defense in depth” is the name of the game, Bressers says, and in this case, it should include the following security layers:

  • Discovery of data exposure (using the previously mentioned external scanning systems)
  • Strong authentication (SSO or usernames/passwords)
  • Prioritization of data access (e.g., HR may only need access to employee information and the accounting department may only need access to budget and tax data)
  • Deployment of monitoring infrastructures and automated solutions that can quickly identify potential problems before they become emergencies, isolate infected databases, and flag to support and IT teams for next steps

He also advises organizations that don’t have the internal expertise to set security configurations and managing a clustered database to hire of service providers that can handle data management and have a strong security portfolio, and to always have a mitigation plan in place and rehearse it with their IT and security teams so that when something does happen, they can execute a swift and intentional response.

Source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *