DaaS, BYOD, leasing and buying: Which is better for cybersecurity?

In the digital age, staff expect employers to provide hardware, and companies need hardware that allows employees to work efficiently and securely. There are already a number of models to choose from to purchase and manage hardware, however, with remote work policies becoming more popular, enterprises have to prioritize cybersecurity when making their selection.

Daas BYOD

The COVID-19 pandemic and online shift has brought to light the need for robust cybersecurity strategies and technology that facilitates safe practices. Since the pandemic started, the FBI has reported a 300 percent increase in cybercrime. As more businesses are forced to operate at a distance, hackers are taking advantage of weak links in their networks. At the same time, the crisis has meant many enterprises have had to cut their budgets, and so risk compromising cybersecurity when opting for more cost-effective measures.

Currently, Device-as-Service (DaaS), Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) and leasing/buying are some of the most popular hardware options. To determine which is most appropriate for your business cybersecurity needs, here are the pros and cons of each:

Device-as-a-Service (DaaS)

DaaS models are when an organization distributes hardware like computers, tablets, and phones to employees with preconfigured and customized services and software. For many enterprises, DaaS is attractive because it allows them to acquire technology without having to outright buy, set up, and manage it – therefore saving time and money in the long run. Because of DaaS’s growing popularity, 65 percent of major PC manufacturers now offer DaaS capabilities, including Apple and HP.

When it comes to cybersecurity, DaaS is favorable because providers are typically experts in the field. In the configuration phase, they are responsible for ensuring that all devices have the latest security protections installed as standard, and they are also responsible for maintaining such protections. Once the hardware is in use, DaaS models allow providers to monitor the company’s entire fleet – checking that all devices adhere to security policies, including protocols around passwords, approved apps, and accessing sensitive data.

Another bonus is that DaaS can offer analytical insights about hardware, such as device location and condition. With this information, enterprises can be alerted if tech is stolen, missing or outdated and a threat to overall cybersecurity. Not to mention, a smart way to boost the level of protection given by DaaS models is to integrate it with Unified Endpoint Management (UEM). UEM helps businesses organize and control internet-enabled devices from a single interface and uses mobile threat detection to identify and thwart vulnerabilities or attacks among devices.

Nonetheless, to effectively utilize DaaS, enterprises have to determine their own relevant security principles before adopting the model. They then need to have an in-depth understanding of how these principles are applied throughout DaaS services and how the level of assurance enacts them. Assuming that DaaS completely removes enterprises from being involved in device cybersecurity would be unwise.

Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD)

BYOD is when employees use their own mobile, laptops, PCs, and tablets for work. In this scenario, companies have greater flexibility and can make significant cost savings, but, there are many more risks associated with personal devices compared to corporate-issued devices. Although BYOD is favorable among employees – who can use devices that they are more familiar with – enterprises essentially lose control and visibility of how data is transmitted, stored, and processed.

Personal devices are dangerous because hackers can create a sense of trust via personal apps on the hardware and more easily coerce users into sharing business details or download malicious content. Plus, with BYOD, companies are dependent on employees keeping all their personal devices updated with the most current protective services. One employee forgetting to do so could negate the cybersecurity for the overall network.

Similar to DaaS, UEM can also help companies that have adopted BYOD take a more centralized approach to manage the risk of exposing their data to malicious actors. For example, UEM can block websites or content from personal devices, as well as implement passcodes, and device and disk encryption. Alternatively, VPNs are common to enhance cybersecurity in companies that allow BYOD. In the COVID-19 pandemic, 68 percent of employees claim their company has expanded VPN usage as a direct result of the crisis. It’s worthwhile noting though, that VPNs only encrypt data accessed via the internet and cloud-based services.

When moving forward with BYOD models, enterprises must host regular training and education sessions around safe practices on devices, including recognizing threats, avoiding harmful websites, and the importance of upgrading. They also need to have documented and tested computer security incident response plans, so if any attacks do occur, they are contained as soon as possible.

Leasing / buying

Leasing hardware is when enterprises obtain equipment on a rental basis, in order to retain working capital that can be invested in other areas. In the past, as many as 80 percent of businesses chose to lease their hardware. The trend is less popular today, as SaaS products have proven to be more tailored and scalable.

Still, leasing is beneficial because rather than jeopardizing cybersecurity to purchase large volumes of hardware, enterprises can rent fully covered devices. Likewise, because the latest software typically requires the latest hardware, companies can rent the most recent tech at a fraction of the retail cost.

Comparable to DaaS providers, leasing companies are responsible for device maintenance and have to ensure that every laptop, phone, and tablet has the appropriate security software. Again, however, this does not absolve enterprises from taking an active role in cybersecurity implementation and surveillance.

Unlike leasing, where there can be uncertainty over who owns the cybersecurity strategy, buying is more straightforward. Purchasing hardware outright means companies have complete control over devices and can cherry-pick cybersecurity features to include. It also means they can be more flexible with cybersecurity partners, running trials with different solutions to evaluate which is the best fit.

That said, buying hardware has a noticeable downside where equipment becomes obsolete once new versions are released. 73 percent of senior leaders from enterprises actually agree that an abundance of outdated equipment leaves companies vulnerable to data security breaches. Considering that, on average, a product cycle takes only 12 to 24 months, and there are thousands of hardware manufacturers at work, devices can swiftly become outdated.

Additionally, because buying is a more permanent action, enterprises run the risk of being stuck with hardware that has been compromised. As opposed to software which can be relatively easily patched to fix, hardware often has to be sent off-site for repairs. This may result in enterprises with limited hardware continuing to use damaged or unprotected devices to avoid downtime in workflows.

If and when a company does decide to dispose of hardware, there are complications around guaranteeing that systems are totally blocked and databases or networks cannot be accessed afterwards. In contrast, providers from DaaS and leasing models expertly wipe devices at the end of contracts or when disposing of them, so enterprises don’t have to be concerned about unauthorized access.

Putting cybersecurity front-and-center

DaaS, BYOD, and leasing/buying all have their own unique benefits when it comes to cybersecurity. Despite all the perks, it has to be acknowledged that BYOD and leasing pose the biggest obstacles for enterprises because they take cybersecurity monitoring and control out of companies’ hands. Nevertheless, for all the options mentioned, UEM is a valuable way to bridge gaps and empower businesses to be in control of cybersecurity, while still being agile.

Ultimately, the most impactful cybersecurity measures are the ones that enterprises are firmly vested in, whatever hardware model they adopt. Businesses should never underestimate the power of a transparent, well-researched, and constantly evolving security framework – one which a hardware model complements, not solely creates.

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